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Greater Pittsburgh Chapter Meeting
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4/19/2017
When: April 19, 2017
6:00 PM
Where: Foster's Restaurant
#10 Foster Plaza
Greentree
United States
Contact: Heather Krivos

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Association of Engineering and Environmental Geologists - Greater Pittsburgh Chapter
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 Meeting


AEG/PGS/ASCE jointly present 15TH ANNUAL STUDENT NIGHT

The Pittsburgh Geological Society presents DEFORMATION PATTERNS FROM STRAIN INVERSIONS ALONG THE EASTERN MARGIN OF THE OROGENIC SUTURE IN EASTERN TAIWAN BY CATE BRESSERS, INDIANA UNIV. OF PA

The American Society of Civil Engineers – Pittsburgh Geologic Institute presents HISTORIC REVIEW OF LANDSLIDES AFFECTING RAILROADS IN OHIO AND
PENNSYLVANIA BY DAVID H. MANGOLD, UNIV. OF AKRON

The Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists Greater Pittsburgh Chapter presents ASSESSING SEDIMENT MAGNETISM AS A PROXY FOR HEAVY METAL POLLUTION IN NORTHERN OHIO FLUVIAL SYSTEMS BY GABRIELLE GROMOFSKY, UNIV. OF AKRON

LOCATION: Foster’s Restaurant, Foster Plaza Building 10 Green Tree, PA
AGENDA: Social hour - 6:00 p.m. Dinner - 7:00 p.m. Program - 8:00 p.m.
DINNER COSTS: $30.00/person, students $10.00; checks preferred. For reservations, please email your name and number of attendees in your party to pgsreservations@gmail.com. You can also reserve and pay for dinners via PayPal on our website http://pittsburghgeologicalsociety.org. Please include your name and number of attendees in your party. The deadline for reservations is noon on Monday, April 17.

 

DEFORMATION PATTERNS FROM STRAIN INVERSIONS ALONG THE EASTERN MARGIN OF THE OROGENIC SUTURE IN EASTERN TAIWAN
BRESSERS, Cate A., and LEWIS, J.C., Geoscience Department, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvani
a, Indiana, PA 15701, cate.bressers@gmail.com
The Longitudinal Valley Fault System (LVFS) in Taiwan is one of the world's most tectonically active belts, an area of particularly high seismicity, and one of the few places where active suturing is occurring. This research examines an eastern-dipping, 3D planar package of seismic events located along the LVFS as a proxy for non-recoverable strain in the seismic source zone to identify whether the package of events is representative of a relatively homogeneous oblique collision or if strain is spatially partitioned. The answer to this question will help resolve the kinematics and evolution of Taiwan and may help contribute to an understanding of suture processes in general. Most of the seismicity extends to roughly 25-30 km and are predominantly composed of obliqueslip and thrusting focal mechanisms. From 30-50 km strike-slip, oblique-slip, and extensional events dominate. In this research, clusters of seismicity are selected for inversion to spatially separate strike-slip and dip-slip components. Both the inversions and graphical analysis of focal mechanism components indicate N-S heterogeneity in deformation patterns and along depth. Reverse dip-slip motion dominates in the extreme north and south and trends toward oblique motion approaching central eastern Taiwan. The central latitude, west of the Ryukyu trench, presents with a conspicuous region of apparent crustal thinning (e.g., subhorizontal extension) at shallow depths which corresponds with a lateral decrease in seismicity.


HISTORIC REVIEW OF LANDSLIDES AFFECTING RAILROADS IN OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA MANGOLD, David H., Department of Geosciences, University of Akron, Akron OH 44325-4101, davemangold@hotmail.com
Throughout the history of railroads landslides of various types and constructed embankment failures on right-of ways have been a troublesome problem for railroads in geologically hazardous landscapes. Historic occurrences of landslides affecting the railroads which have become part of the landscape evolution of the Appalachian region will be analyzed. This analysis of the causes and the mitigating solutions of significant landslide events which resulted in railroad infrastructure damage, route closures and relocations will be reviewed. These case analyses will review the geology, history, mechanisms, the costs and overall economic impact on society of these troublesome events. An understanding of the lessons learned and prospects for improvements for safety planning and economic preservation of viable rail lines throughout Ohio and Pennsylvania and all of North America will be gained from analysis of these landslide occurrences. Reviews of landslide and embankment failures at Kilbuck, Pennsylvania in 2006, Wooster, Ohio in 1997 and at other unique locations and recent occurrences will be reviewed.

With a thorough analysis of past landslide events on railroads, significant improvements can be made in the mitigation of future occurrences to make rail transportation across sometimes unstable landscapes with significantly reduced risk. This knowledge of past landslide events and necessary improvements will benefit the safety and economic competiveness of the rail lines throughout the Appalachian region and all of North America in the future.

ASSESSING SEDIMENT MAGNETISM AS A PROXY FOR HEAVY METAL POLLUTION IN NORTHERN OHIO FLUVIAL SYSTEMS GROMOFSKY, Gabrielle A., and Peck, J.A., Department of Geosciences, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-4101, gag23@zips.uakron.edu
Human activity, such as road travel and manufacturing, produce heavy metal contamination that may be harmful to biologic components in the fluvial environment. Combustion processes often result in heavy metal pollution that can also be highly magnetic. Geochemical methods quantify trace metal concentration, but are destructive to the sediment sample, relatively expensive, and time consuming to perform. However, magnetic methods are non-destructive to sediment samples, relatively inexpensive, and rapid to measure. The objective of this study is to determine if sediment magnetic properties can be used as a screening tool for estimating heavy metal concentration in river sediment and identifying potential pollution hotspots. Prior work has shown that rivers in Ohio which flow from rural to urban landscapes have an increase in ferrimagnetic content of the channel sediment upon entering the urban setting. Ongoing work will measure the concentration of lead, chromium, zinc, and copper in river sediments using the total digestion method to determine if sediment magnetic properties can be used as a heavy metal proxy.

STUDENT POSTER PRESENTATIONS

DETERMINING INFLUENCE OF STREAM MANAGEMENT ON INCREASED FLOODING IN A GLACIAL LOWLAND STREAM.
James Bader, California University of Pennsylvania

ROAD SALTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE PH LEVELS AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF DIFFERENT SOIL TYPES
Amy Burnett and Kyle Fredrick, California University of Pennsylvania

SPECIATION OF IRON
IN MINGO CREEK, NEW EAGLE, PENNSYLVANIA
Derek Hussak, California University of Pennsylvania

GEOMORPHIC FORCING UPON THE WHITE RIVER BADLANDS IN THE CONTEXT OF THE MEDIEVAL CLIMATE ANOMALY, AS RECORDED BY PROXIES ACROSS THE MIDCONTINENT, NORTH AMERICA
Maraina Miles and Patrick A.Burkhart, Slippery Rock University and Paul Baldauf, Nova Southeastern University

A CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FOREKNOBS FORMATION
Kyle Potts, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF ABANDONED MINE TUNNELS AT WALLY ROSE FIELD
Nicholas Russo, Frankie DeRose, and Brian Miller, Slippery Rock University

 

 

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